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Naranjo Info
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  • Altar 1
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  • Lintel 1
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  • Sculpture 1
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Naranjo: Lintel 1
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LOCATION Found by Maler reused in the second step of the Hieroglyphic Stairway, between Inscription 7 and Inscription 8 in Morley's terminology, or Step VII and Step VIIl in the informal usage of this work. Removed by Herbert J. Spinden to the American Museum of Natural History in 1914.

CONDITION Found by Maler buried in debris and rather well preserved, although trimmed down from its original size. Already cracked, Spinden broke the lintel to carry it away; this action resulted in no significant loss of detail. Textual evidence shows that a whole column of glyphs was anciently trimmed off the left side, and half a column on the right. Maler was probably mistaken in supposing the upper border also to have been trimmed before reuse in the stairway.

MATERIAL Limestone.

SHAPE Essentially rectangular, with a narrow, wellfinished border above and one that is wider and more roughly dressed below.

CARVED AREAS Front only (or underside, if truly a lintel).

PHOTOGRAPH Reproduced from Maler's original negative of 1905.

DRAWING Graham, based on Maler's photograph and on a drawing made of the original lintel on display, mounted in a showcase from which it was evidently not convenient to remove it.

REMARKS This piece might better have been called Panel 1. The fact thai inscriptions on lintels generally run down rather than across and the inequality of the borders suggest a panel, one perhaps that had its lower edge set in a floor, A further point is that carved stone lintels are otherwise unknown in the eastern Maya lowlands.

DIMENSIONS

Ht 0.47 m
MW 0.70 m
HSc 0.37 m
MTh unknown
Rei unknown
 

 

INSCRIPTIONS

 
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