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Seibal Info
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  • Panel 1
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  • Stela 1
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  • Stela 2
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  • Stela 3
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  • Stela 4
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  • Stela 5
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  • Stela 6
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  • Stela 7
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  • Stela 8
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  • Stela 9
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  • Stela 10
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  • Stela 11
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  • Stela 12
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  • Stela 13
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  • Stela 14
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  • Stela 15
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  • Stela 16
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  • Stela 17
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  • Stela 18
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  • Stela 19
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  • Stela 20
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  • Stela 21
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  • Tablet 1
   
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Seibal: Stela 3
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LOCATION Maler described Stela 4 as having been adorned by a fine low relief representing a richly clad personage of rank, but broken into so many pieces that he could make nothing of it (1908, p. 15). It then disappeared from view for the next sixty years until, during a hiatus in vigilance at the site, an intruder noticed it and dug in search of a cache. On hearing of this discovery, I went to the site, but had only enough time to brush dirt from the front surface of the stela, sketch it, and take hasty photographs. Somewhat better photographs were taken in 1993. The stela had evidently fallen on its back, and perhaps only later was cracked into pieces by a falling tree, since the fragments lay undisturbed in their correct relative positions. In this respect the stela does not conform to Maler's description, but it is unlikely to be another since it was found close to the position shown on Maler's rough plan of the site. There it remains, as found, and buried once again under a thin covering of soil.

CONDITION Broken into six large and four small fragments. The surface is badly eroded except in the lower-left region.

MATERIAL A limestone neither hard nor fine-grained, with a high content of shells and grit, and showing several naturally recemented fissures.

SHAPE Front fairly flat; sides nearly parallel, though the right side bulges somewhat. Top flattish.

DIMENSIONS

HLC 1.63m
PB 0.79m
MW 0.96m
WBC 0.90m
MTh 0.24m
Rel 2.0cm

CARVED AREAS Front only.

PHOTOGRAPHS Graham.

DRAWING Graham, based on a field drawing partially revised by controlled light.

 

 

INSCRIPTIONS

 
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