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  • Capital 1
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  • Capital 2
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  • Capital 3
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  • Capital 4
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  • Capital 5
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  • Column 1
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  • Column 2
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  • Column 3
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  • Column 4
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  • Column 5
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  • Column 6
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  • Cornice 1
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  • Jamb 1
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  • Jamb 2
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  • Jamb 3
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  • Jamb 4
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  • Jamb 5
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  • Jamb 6
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  • Jamb 7
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  • Jamb 8
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  • Jamb 9
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  • Lintel 1
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  • Lintel 2
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  • Lintel 3
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  • Lintel 4
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  • Misc 5
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  • Panel 1
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  • Panel 2
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  • Panel 3
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  • Panel 4
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  • Panel 5
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  • Panel 6
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  • Panel 7
   
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Xcalumkin: Lintel 1
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LOCATION The term lintel as used here embraces the three lintel slabs that once spanned the triple entrance on the south side of the east chamber of the Initial Series Building. Because of damage to the ends of the two surviving slabs it cannot be determined whether these slabs were placed end-to-end in contiguity or were separated by small blocks, each carved with a single glyph, one placed centrally on the capital of the east column, and one on the west. Assuming that the former arrangement was employed, the long slabs may be designated as Stones I to 1lI (numbering from west to east), and it is safe to assume that a single inscription ran from one end to the other. When found by Maler, Stone I, spanning the western entrance, and the capitals supporting it were still in place, while the lintel-slab of the central aperture, Stone II, lay on the ground, probably near where it fell. Stone III from the eastern entrance has not been found.

In order to include them in his photograph (Peabody Museum print P18l5), Maler placed six other carved stones on top of the fallen Stone II. One is a fragment of Jamb 2, another is provisionally identified as the capital of the same jamb (Cap. 3); the others are presumed to be fragments of Stones II and III-or else of the two hypothetical intermediate stones. The glyphs on these fragments and on another that is visible in a photograph by Pollock (1970, fig. 707) have been given p (provisional) numbers, with these not implying any particular arrangement. It should be noted that in Pollock's photograph this last-named fragment is seen placed next to Stone I, where it was dearly out of place: the glyph it bears does not match up with Glyph H, and Maler's photograph reveals it was not found in that position. Stones I and II and one fragment are in the Museo Ba!uartes Ia Soledad, Campeche; the rest have disappeared. The elevation drawing of the doorway has been prepared to scale from measurements taken by Pollock (Peabody Museum Archives).

CONDITION The surviving stones were reasonably well preserved at discovery and remain in much the same condition. Stone II, perhaps in falling, suffered damage at the edges.

MATERIAL Limestone.

SHAPE The exposed surfaces are well dressed.

CARVED AREAS Front only.

PHOTOGRAPHS Stones I and II: von Euw; the plasler cast reproduced from a Peabody Museum photo; the fragments from an original Maler photo (Peabody Museum print P1815).

DRAWINGS von Euw and Graham, based on photographs, and in the case of Stones I and II, on field drawings corrected by artificial light.

DIMENSIONS

Stone I: HI 0.28 m
MW 1.69m
MTh 0.61 m
Rel O.5cm
Stone II: HI 0.26 m
MW 1.39 m
MTh 0.50 m
Rel 1.1 cm
 

 

INSCRIPTIONS

 
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