Boat Model

Photo by Nick Bunn.
Photo by Nick Bunn.
Photo by Nick Bunn.
Photo by Nick Bunn.
Photo by Nick Sertl.

Within my first blog post, I initially looked into the background, making assumptions regarding the origins of the model. Rather than starting with ideas and looking to almost find what I had preconceived, I used the model as my primary source of information, seeking additional references only to help clarify. As a result of this change in method, I found a significant amount more of clarity. As I focused primarily on the purpose of the boat, I could draw conclusions without making generalizations about origin. I believe the ship to be of Sri Lanka decent and attempt to prove that in my third blog post. At the moment, it’s just about taking steps. Attached is a photo of rope located on the support beams to drag fish nets. This acted as a main point within my argument, demonstrating key evidence in favor of the model being a fishing vessel. Find out more.

Nick Bunn

 

The most pressing problem that any civilization faces is how to feed its people. In Hawaii the solution to this problem always came from the sea. Many thousands of fishing canoes were recorded by Cook and other early European explorers of Hawaii. Over the course of many centuries, the design of the fishing canoe was optimized to catch fish. The end result of the evolution of the fishing canoe was a stripped down machine built primarily for speed. This resulted in a somewhat flawed canoe, as it did not last very long and could be very unstable when the waters were rough. But these flaws did not matter to the Hawaiians, because this design of canoe was able to catch a huge proportion of their protein. Click to read more.

Nick Sertl

 

Content of this page provided by students of Anthro 1218: Shipwrecks and Seafarers, Piracy and Plundering: An Introduction to Maritime Archaeology.