Inside the Peabody Museum January 2017

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A Recent Acquisition

A Historic Stand and the People of Standing Rock   

Visit Iran with a Harvard Art Scholar   

 milk pot

A Recent Acquisition

Elizabeth Hopkins, a political anthropologist and Emerita Professor at Smith College, collected this milk pot while living among the Bahima, pastoral nomads of Uganda, in the early 1960s. Interestingly, at that time the objects used by the pastoral Bahima were made for them by agricultural peoples and acquired in trade. According to Dr. Hopkins, the only things the Bahima produced, in addition to milk and ghee, were basketry covers for the milk pots. Not long after Dr. Hopkins’ stay with the Bahima, political changes and national policy initiatives altered their pastoral way of life.

--Amy Wolff Cay, Associate Registrar for Acquisitions

LaDonna Brave Bull Allard in Wiyohpiyata exhibition

A Historic Stand and the People of Standing Rock 

“The US government may only be a temporary government here. This is our land this will always be our land for time immemorial and we fight for this land. It doesn’t matter which government is here.”

--LaDonna Brave Bull Allard (Standing Rock Sioux Tribe) from a 2006 interview featured in the exhibition Wiyohpiyata: Lakota Images of the Contested West.

The exhibition looks at westward expansion and native peoples’ response to it, providing historic context for the recent protests at Standing Rock reservation--home of the Hunkpapa and other northern Sioux bands--and where Allard has been active. Allard is one of several Standing Rock tribal members interviewed in the exhibition about warrior culture  and tribal history including the Battle on the Little Big Horn and Sitting Bull. “Wiyohpiyata [which means “west” in Lakota] addresses the history of the people of Standing Rock,” says Castle McLaughlin, who co-curated the exhibition with artist and educator Butch Thunder Hawk of Standing Rock. She continued, “The historic dispossession and resistance depicted in Wiyohpiyata laid some of the groundwork for the recent resistance to oil pipelines at Standing Rock. Unfortunately, conflict between Indians and settler communities over lands and resources has characterized our shared histories in North America.”

 

 An In-Depth Exploration

 

Visit Iran with a Harvard Art Scholar

Harvard Museums of Science & Culture Travel invites you to uncover the extraordinary cultural heritage of Iran, a land dotted with monuments and other carved reminders of several ancient civilizations leading up to the Persian Empire. Beyond unraveling Iran’s rich history, participants will also discuss what lies ahead for this pivotal nation with Study Leader David Roxburgh, Prince Alwaleed bin Talal Professor of Islamic Art History and Chair of the Department of History of Art and Architecture at Harvard University. Inside Iran: An In-Depth Exploration travel dates are September 9–29 2017.


Image credits:  Milk pot with basketry cover from Bahima, Ankole Kingdom, Uganda; early 1960s or before. Wood, plant fiber. Gift of Elizabeth Hopkins. Courtesy of the Peabody Museum of Archaeology & Ethnology, Harvard University. PM# 2016.14.36 (digital file #99350047). LaDonna Brave Bull Allard still frame from Wiyohpiyata exhibition video. © President and Fellows of Harvard College.


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