Inside the Peabody Museum August 2017

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People Actually Lived at the 1893 Chicago World's Fair

Here's Why One Peabody Staffer Says, "I Love My Job!"

In Case You Missed It...

 Portrait Types of the Midway Plaisance

People Actually Lived at the 1893 Chicago World's Fair

The new All the World Is Here exhibition features an interactive display about the people of the Midway Plaisance, the exoticized entertainment center where the Fair’s genteel audience could meander through replicated “villages,” complete with markets, teahouses, theaters, and a harem. Visitors could purchase souvenirs, meet indigenous peoples, and experience their worlds through sensational performances, elaborate parades, exotic foods, and craft demonstrations. As the Midway introduced audiences to some world peoples for the first time, it also created cultural stereotypes, many of which can be seen in the book Portrait Types of the Midway Plaisance. Not all indigenous residents were happy with their treatment on the Midway and some brought legal action to improve their conditions. 

Peabody Museum visitors can explore the digitized Portrait Types book, which contains portraits and brief descriptions of people who lived and worked in the "villages" for the six-month duration of the Fair, among others. Museum curators and students added newly researched biographical information and context about the portrait subjects, all accessible through the interactive exhibit in the gallery.  Exhibition details   

Fungus

Here's Why One Peabody Staffer Says, "I Love My Job!"

Collections Steward Meredith Vasta says, “I love my job because I learn something new every day!” Vasta is one of the small team that responds to researchers’ requests about Peabody collections. She recently told staff, “Here is an object from our collection that I have enjoyed learning a bit more about in preparation for an upcoming research visit. It’s a fungus of Ganoderma species from Papua New Guinea. This object was recently studied by a visiting researcher and that work is now featured in this quarter’s FUNGI magazine."

Gift of Patrick T. L. Putnam, 1927 © President and Fellows of Harvard College, Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology, PM# 27-56-70/D2797.

Henry David Thoreau collection

In Case You Missed It

Happy 200th birthday, Henry David Thoreau! Some 900 stone artifacts collected by Thoreau around the Concord, Massachusetts area were donated to the museum in 1869. Axes, pestles, mortars, chisels, spear points, and ornaments were among the gift from the Boston Society of Natural History. Several are on view in The Legacy of Penobscot Canoes exhibition. --From the Peabody's Facebook page on July 12; follow us on Facebook for more.

Gift of the Boston Society of Natural History, © President and Fellows of Harvard College, Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology, PM# 69-34-10/2382.
 

   


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