For Immediate Release

Gordon R. Willey Lecture

The Teotihuacan Cosmogram and Polity: Update on the Sacred City and its Three Monuments

(Cambridge, March 1, 2011) Why did the rulers of the ancient city of Teotihuacan create and maintain a sophisticated city layout that lasted for centuries? Teotihuacan was the largest city in the New World during the first millennium AD; it integrated three major monuments into a unique city layout. The Sun Pyramid, the Moon Pyramid, and the Citadel complex conformed to the city’s rigorous standards for orientation, spatial distribution, and architectural style.

The Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology presents the Gordon R. Willey lecture, "The Teotihuacan Cosmogram and Polity: Update on the Sacred City and its Three Monuments" at 5:30 PM on Tuesday, March 29, 2011 at Harvard's Geological Lecture Hall (24 Oxford St.), followed by a reception at the Peabody Museum (11 Divinity Ave.). The speaker is Saburo Sugiyama, Professor of International Cultural Studies, Aichi Prefectural University & School of Human Evolution and Social Change.

Recent explorations of the three pyramids revealed how and when they were constructed. Most importantly, numerous sacrificial/elite graves were found with exceptionally rich offerings that provided substantial new information on the ancient worldview and the state politics. With these new discoveries, Dr. Sugiyama interprets Teotihuacan’s possible ritual significance, state ideology, and sacred rulership.

About Gordon R. Willey
Gordon R. Willey was one of the foremost archaeologists of pre-Colombian America. He was distinguished by his meticulous research of Maya archaeological sites in Belize, Guatemala, and Honduras, and noted for his pioneering work in settlement pattern studies. Gordon Willey taught at Harvard for 36 years until his retirement in 1984. He served as emeritus senior professor of anthropology until his death in 2002.

About the Peabody Museum
The Peabody Museum is among the oldest archaeological and ethnographic museums in the world with one of the finest collections of human cultural history found anywhere. It is home to superb materials from Africa, ancient Europe, North America, Mesoamerica, Oceania, and South America in particular. In addition to its archaeological and ethnographic holdings, the Museum’s photographic archives, one of the largest of its kind, hold more than 500,000 historical photographs, dating from the mid-nineteenth century to the present and chronicling anthropology, archaeology, and world culture.

Hours and location: 9 A.M. to 5 P.M., seven days a week. The Museum is closed on Thanksgiving Day, Christmas Eve, Christmas Day, and New Year’s Day. Admission is $9 for adults, $7 for students and seniors, $6 for children, 3–18. Free with Harvard ID or Museum membership. The Museum is free to Massachusetts residents Sundays, 9 A.M. to noon, year round, and Wednesdays from 3 P.M. to 5 P.M. (September to May). Admission includes admission to the Harvard Museum of Natural History. For more information call 617-496-1027 or go online to: www.peabody.harvard.edu. The Peabody Museum is located at 11 Divinity Avenue in Cambridge, Massachusetts. The Museum is a short walk from the Harvard Square MBTA station.

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The Sun pyramid, Teotihuacan. Photo by Saburo Sugiyama.

The Sun pyramid, Teotihuacan. Photo by Saburo Sugiyama.

High resolution image available on request.
 
Gordon R. Willey Lecture: The Teotihuacan Cosmogram and Polity: Update on the Sacred City and its Three Monuments
 
Speaker: Saburo Sugiyama, Professor, International Cultural Studies, Aichi Prefectural University & School of Human Evolution and Social Change
 
Where: Geological Lecture Hall (24 Oxford St., Cambridge) with a reception to follow at the Peabody Museum (11 Divinity Ave.)
 
When: 5:30 PM, Tuesday March 29, 2011
 
Public Information: 617-496-1027 or www.peabody.harvard.edu/calendar
 

 

 

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