Visible Language Series Lecture

Adopting and Adapting Writing in Native Nations of the Northeast

Early Native American writers are often portrayed as defying the colonial world and struggling to exist within it. In striking counterpoint, Lisa Brooks demonstrates the ways in which Native leaders adopted writing as a tool to reclaim rights and land in the northeastern United States.

The Peabody Museum of Archaeology & Ethnology presents the illustrated talk, "Adopting and Adapting Writing in Native Nations of the Northeast" on Thursday, March 24, 2011 at Harvard's Geological Lecture Hall (24 Oxford St.). It is part of the Peabody Museum's year-long Visible Language lecture series. A public reception will follow at the Peabody Museum.

Reframing the historical landscape of the region, Brooks constructs a provocative new picture of Native space before and after colonization. By recovering and reexamining Algonquian and Iroquoian texts, she shows that writing was not a foreign technology. Instead, it was a crucial weapon in the Native Americans' arsenal as they resisted colonial domination and continue to oppose it today.

Lisa Brooks is an Assistant Professor of History and Literature and of Folklore and Mythology at Harvard University.

 

 

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birchbark scroll

Montagnais birchbark scroll with writing in French. PM 94-38-10/52507 N5423. This image shows the adaptation of forms of writing and mapmaking, with the Montagnais' use of French script and the drawing of both Christian and woodland imagery on a birchbark scroll. This was a message directed to their priest.

Thursday, March 24, 2011: "Adopting and Adapting Writing in Native Nations of the Northeast"

Lisa Brooks, Assistant Professor of History and Literature and of Folklore and Mythology, Harvard University

5:30 PM Geological Lecture Hall, 24 Oxford St., Cambridge, followed by a public reception at the Peabody Museum, 11 Divinity Ave., Cambridge

FREE

Information: 617-496-1027 or www.peabody.harvard.edu/calendar

See more about the Visible Language series.

 


 

 

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