The Legacy of Penobscot Canoes

Penobscot canoe
Penobscot birchbark canoe. PM 29-33-10/98432. 

A View from the River

April 12, 2014 through April 30, 2016

Native American birchbark canoes have often been described as one of the greatest inventions in human history and were copied by Euroamerican fur traders and sportsmen. The Legacy of Penobscot Canoes: A View from the River explores the enduring importance of rivers and canoes in Penobscot tribal life and on relationships between the tribe and non-Indians. This new installation features a rarely seen full-size bark canoe purchased from Penobscot Indian Francis Sebattis in 1912, as well as stone tools collected by Henry David Thoreau, who described the Penobscot and their canoes in The Maine Woods.

See the related exhibition at the adjacent Harvard Museum of Natural History, Thoreau's Maine Woods: A Journey in Photographs with Scot Miller. The exhibition commemorates the 150th anniversary of the publication of Henry David Thoreau’s The Maine Woods. Exquisite prints by Scot Miller, who traversed Maine for years, retracing the footsteps of New England’s native son, accompany original text from Thoreau's essay collection. (Thoreau's Maine Woods runs through September 1, 2014.)

 


 

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