For Immediate Release

New Exhibition

The Legacy of Penobscot Canoes: A View from the River

(Cambridge, MA February 11, 2014) Native American birch bark canoes have often been described as one of the greatest inventions in human history and were copied by Euroamerican fur traders and sportsmen. The Legacy of Penobscot Canoes: A View from the River explores the enduring importance of rivers and canoes in Penobscot tribal life and on relationships between the tribe and non-Indians. This new installation features a rarely seen full-size bark canoe purchased from Penobscot Indian Francis Sebattis in 1912, as well as stone tools collected by Henry David Thoreau, who described the Penobscot and their canoes in The Maine Woods.

The Legacy of Penobscot Canoes: A View from the River opens to the public Saturday, April 12 at 9:00 AM at Harvard University's Peabody Museum of Archaeology & Ethnology at 11 Divinity Avenue, Cambridge, Mass. It will remain on view through 2014.

See the related exhibition at the adjacent Harvard Museum of Natural History, Thoreau's Maine Woods: A Journey in Photographs with Scot Miller, running through September 1, 2014.) Admission to the Peabody Museum includes admission to the Harvard Museum of Natural History.

About the Peabody Museum
The Peabody Museum is among the oldest archaeological and ethnographic museums in the world with one of the finest collections of human cultural history found anywhere. It is home to superb materials from Africa, ancient Europe, North America, Mesoamerica, Oceania, and South America in particular. In addition to its archaeological and ethnographic holdings, the Museum’s photographic archives, one of the largest of its kind, hold more than 500,000 historical photographs, dating from the mid-nineteenth century to the present and chronicling anthropology, archaeology, and world culture. In 2012, the museum joined the Harvard Museums of Science & Culture, a consortium of four museums in the Faculty of Arts and Sciences at Harvard University. The four museums open to the public are Harvard Museum of Natural History, Collection of Historical Scientific Instruments, Harvard Semitic Museum, and Peabody Museum of Archaeology & Ethnology, together exploring Earth’s history, life, and cultures.

Hours and location: 9 A.M. to 5 P.M., seven days a week. The Museum is closed on Thanksgiving Day, Christmas Eve, Christmas Day, and New Year’s Day. The Peabody Museum is located at 11 Divinity Avenue in Cambridge, Massachusetts. The Museum is a short walk from the Harvard Square MBTA station. Admission is $12 for adults, $10 for students and seniors, $8 for children, ages 3–18. Free with Harvard ID or Museum membership. The Museum is free to Massachusetts residents Sundays, 9 A.M. to noon, year round, and Wednesdays from 3 P.M. to 5 P.M. (September to May). Admission to the Peabody Museum includes admission to the Harvard Museum of Natural History. For more information call 617-496-1027 or go to www.peabody.harvard.edu.

Find us on Facebookfacebook link, Flickrflickr link, Twittertwitter link, and YouTube YouTube link

Media Contact:

Faith Sutter
Communications Coordinator
Peabody Museum
Tel: 617-495-3397
sutter@fas.harvard.edu 

Penobscot birch bark canoe. PM 29-33-10.

High resolution images available on request. 

Exhibition open to the public Saturday, April 12, 2014

Regular museum admission rates apply.

Information: 617-496-1027

See the related exhibition at the adjacent Harvard Museum of Natural History, Thoreau's Maine Woods: A Journey in Photographs with Scot Miller