Where the Roads All End: The Marshall Family’s Kalahari Photography

Date: 

May 10, 2017, 6:00 pm

Location: 

Geological Lecture Hall, 24 Oxford Street, Cambridge, MA 02138
Khuan//a, a Ju/'hoansi girl, with a musical instrument called a //gwashi, 1953. Photograph probably by Laurence Marshall or Anneliese Scherz. PM 2001.29.258. (digital file #97010007).
Khuan//a, a Ju/'hoansi girl, with a musical instrument called a //gwashi, 1953. Photograph probably by Laurence Marshall or Anneliese Scherz. PM 2001.29.258. (digital file #97010007).

3D Lecture and Book Signing 

Ilisa Barbash, Curator of Visual Anthropology, Peabody Museum of Archaeology & Ethnology

The Marshall family, which filmed and studied the Ju/’hoansi of the Kalahari Desert, created one of the most significant visual anthropology projects of the twentieth century. Sponsored by the Peabody Museum, the Marshalls made eight trips to Namibia (then South West Africa) in the 1950s to document some of the world’s last surviving self-sufficient hunter-gatherers, the Ju/’hoansi and G/wi people (earlier known pejoratively as “Bushmen” and later as the !Kung and the San). Using the Marshall family’s collection of stereo views taken with a Stereo Realist camera, Ilisa Barbash will discuss the Marshalls’ archive of over 40,000 photographs, the subject of the new book, Where the Roads All End: Anthropology and Photography in the Kalahari (Peabody Museum Press).

The lecture will be followed by a reception and book signing. Books will be available for purchase at the event, at the front desk of the Peabody Museum, and from Harvard University Press.

Free and open to the public. Free event parking available at the 52 Oxford Street Garage. 3D glasses provided free.